Entries in Grade 11 mail art (9)

Sunday
Feb142010

A postcard for Hilton College by Nicky

Sunday
Feb142010

Grade 11 Re(a)d postcards

This wonderful card is by Catherine in inspired by reading the story of Red Riding Hood. The subtle working of the wolf in white ink and the delicate stitching of Red Riding hood in relief on to the surface of the card demonstrates sophisticated and mature handling of materials. Her ability to layer and integrate various media adds further interest to this piece.

Monday
Feb012010

Grade 11 Postcards based on playing Card Theme

I handed my Grade 11's playing cards & challenged them to make a postcard (intended for Hilton College exchange) inspired by the playing card. They also had to draw on the card in any media of their choice. 
The following card is by Nicky 

And this card is by Paige:

Tuesday
Jan262010

Create junk mail into art


I have asked my Grade 11's to make an artwork inspired by something delivered to their home in the mail.  I have just come across an artist who does just this: 



"Junk mail. It gathers in your mailbox like flies to you know what. You can shred it, recycle it, sign up with junk mail killing services, and it still comes. An artist named Sandhi Schimmel Gold of Phoenix makes junk mail into works of art.
She uses advertisements, menus, greeting cards, calendars and personal tax forms to create faces from mailbox trash. And she goes a step further, using re-purposed canvas and frames, and acid-free adhesives and lacquers." 

Friday
Jan222010

Hilton College Cards

The title of this card is called Trade, Speed and Gamble - based on the words printed on the back (above).  The back is made up of collaged elements and a piece of thread has been laminated over the images to create textural interest.
 
The front of Trade, Speed and Gamble has a drawing (ink on plastic) of a gargoyle. Gargoyles were carved on the facades of churches warning people to avoid negative behavior. A decorative printed transparency has been layered over paper pulp that has had a wooden stamp impressed into the paper.  If you look very carefully above the gargoyles's head you will see the original playing card that inspired this card.